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Autism-Training

9 of 10 With Autism Can Work After Training

Autism-Training
When given the right supports and training, a new study suggests that nearly all young people with autism who qualify for supported employment can learn to excel on the job. Nine out of 10 transition-age youth with autism who participated in an intensive job training program were working part-time earning at least minimum wage three months after graduating high school. What’s more, 87 percent were still working after 12 months.

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Artist’s Stunning Photos Shatter Misconceptions About Disabilities

artists-stunning-photos-shatter-misconceptions-disabilitiesCeridwen Hughes, a photographer from North Wales, wants the world to view disabilities differently.
In an effort to change people’s perspectives, she created a photo project called “We Can…” that focuses on what people with disabilities can do, rather than what they cannot. “People make assumptions based on the way people look and act and do not always see the person behind the condition,” Hughes told The Huffington Post.

Read the full article here.

Accessory Dwelling Offers Bridge To Independence

Yung Ting Engelbrecht lounges on his couch watching “Barney” on a tablet. He can scan QR codes taped to the wall that connect him to some of his favorite YouTube videos.

“Where are you going to sleep tonight?” asks his mom, Jacqueline Noel. “New house,” Yung Ting says.

His 288-square-foot accessory dwelling unit is attached to his parents’ house in east Vancouver. Even though he’s lived in the unit for a little over a year, Yung Ting still calls his place “new house” and his parents’ “big house.”

When people initially heard that Yung Ting was getting his own place,

9th Annual World Focus on Autism Raises Global Awareness

autism-speaks-3The Ninth Annual World Focus on Autism event, which coincided with the 71th Anniversary of the United Nations General Assembly in New York City, convened first spouses and dignitaries from across North America, Asia, Africa, Latin America, Europe and the Middle East for an intimate breakfast to unite the global autism community. Participating nations discussed questions surrounding autism and examine disabilities in the context of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

Read the full article here.

Luke’s Best Chance: One Man’s Fight for His Autistic Son

Luke-AutismMore than a million children in America are the autism spectrum. What happens when they come of age? Luke greets me in the hallway, thrusting a book in my direction, then snatches it back and darts into his room. It’s been two weeks since I’ve seen him, and what I desperately want to do is grab him up and hug him till he howls. But because it’s been two weeks – and because he is autistic – I must begin again, from the start line, with my son.  His bedroom, per usual, is a hot mess. The floor is a Slip ‘N Slide of books he’s pulled down,

We Need to Stop Treating People with Disabilities as Less Than Human

Roxan-Perez-joins-more--than-200-protestorsIn the many countries I’ve visited over the past several years while researching conditions for people with disabilities, the one constant – and haunting – refrain I’ve heard from people with disabilities has been: “I am treated as less than human.”

It wasn’t hard to understand why they might feel that way when I saw a five-year old girl in Ghana dressed in rags, with a heavy chain secured to a nearby tree clamped around her legs. This was her fate because her family believed that she was possessed by evil spirits, which is commonly associated with having a disability in many communities.

Families Face Indefinite Wait For Services

Families Face Indefinite Wait For ServicesAbbey Etling lifts the sippy cup to her lips and drinks from it. It’s a small gesture, but one that is laden with meaning
for her mother, Sandy Etling. Being able to lift a cup, drink from it, and set it down without dropping it or spilling it—
it’s something that most adults do without a second thought dozens of times every day. But for Abbey, 22, who has
an intellectual disability and autism, it is a skill that took years to learn and master. She still struggles with putting
the cup down.

Federal Panel Seeks Input On Autism

Federal Panel Seeks Input On AutismA federal autism advisory panel is looking for public feedback as it prepares to update the government’s priorities for addressing the developmental disorder for the first time in years. The Interagency Autism Coordinating Committee is soliciting comments as the group looks to revise its strategic plan. The panel comprised of government officials and members of the autism community is charged with creating and annually updating the federal government’s priorities for autism research, services and policy.

Read the full article here.