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Walk Now For Autism 2017

John-Crawford-Brandi-Fishman-ZeferJoin us on Sunday, May 20th as we walk to help raise funds to support vital research and top-quality programs that are changing the future for those who struggle with autism. Our strength as a community is powered by love and built on the commitment of individuals like you. Start a team, join a team or come on your own. Walk and fund raise together to enhance the lives of people living with autism.

 

Vendor Load In: 10AM
Activities Begin: 11AM
Walk Start: 1PM

Your donation can be designated to a specific individual or team online with just a few clicks or you can send your donations to:

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Zefer is Now Non-Profit!

The Zefer Foundation’s mission is to shift society’s perception of individuals classified as Intellectually and/or Developmentally Disabled. We will accomplish this by collaborating with individuals and agencies to create unprecedented opportunities for inclusion and diversity in all areas of the community with a strong focus on employment opportunities. The Zefer Foundation will provide the support and resources necessary and create an environment that ensures true inclusion is possible in all areas of the community for all of its citizens for the betterment of society, as a whole.

The Zefer Foundation’s non-profit status is now official!

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Artist’s Stunning Photos Shatter Misconceptions About Disabilities

artists-stunning-photos-shatter-misconceptions-disabilitiesCeridwen Hughes, a photographer from North Wales, wants the world to view disabilities differently.
In an effort to change people’s perspectives, she created a photo project called “We Can…” that focuses on what people with disabilities can do, rather than what they cannot. “People make assumptions based on the way people look and act and do not always see the person behind the condition,” Hughes told The Huffington Post.

Read the full article here.

Accessory Dwelling Offers Bridge To Independence

Yung Ting Engelbrecht lounges on his couch watching “Barney” on a tablet. He can scan QR codes taped to the wall that connect him to some of his favorite YouTube videos.

“Where are you going to sleep tonight?” asks his mom, Jacqueline Noel. “New house,” Yung Ting says.

His 288-square-foot accessory dwelling unit is attached to his parents’ house in east Vancouver. Even though he’s lived in the unit for a little over a year, Yung Ting still calls his place “new house” and his parents’ “big house.”

When people initially heard that Yung Ting was getting his own place,

Luke’s Best Chance: One Man’s Fight for His Autistic Son

Luke-AutismMore than a million children in America are the autism spectrum. What happens when they come of age? Luke greets me in the hallway, thrusting a book in my direction, then snatches it back and darts into his room. It’s been two weeks since I’ve seen him, and what I desperately want to do is grab him up and hug him till he howls. But because it’s been two weeks – and because he is autistic – I must begin again, from the start line, with my son.  His bedroom, per usual, is a hot mess. The floor is a Slip ‘N Slide of books he’s pulled down,

We Need to Stop Treating People with Disabilities as Less Than Human

Roxan-Perez-joins-more--than-200-protestorsIn the many countries I’ve visited over the past several years while researching conditions for people with disabilities, the one constant – and haunting – refrain I’ve heard from people with disabilities has been: “I am treated as less than human.”

It wasn’t hard to understand why they might feel that way when I saw a five-year old girl in Ghana dressed in rags, with a heavy chain secured to a nearby tree clamped around her legs. This was her fate because her family believed that she was possessed by evil spirits, which is commonly associated with having a disability in many communities.

Families Face Indefinite Wait For Services

Families Face Indefinite Wait For ServicesAbbey Etling lifts the sippy cup to her lips and drinks from it. It’s a small gesture, but one that is laden with meaning
for her mother, Sandy Etling. Being able to lift a cup, drink from it, and set it down without dropping it or spilling it—
it’s something that most adults do without a second thought dozens of times every day. But for Abbey, 22, who has
an intellectual disability and autism, it is a skill that took years to learn and master. She still struggles with putting
the cup down.